Friday, August 31, 2012

"......... where did Grandpa move to after the First World War Da?

Genealogy, sort of......

All this researching through the local libraries, started us thinking about the movement of people caused by religious persecution, pandemics, war, ......itchy feet too...... which then had us staring at this and directly to this search: Letters from Dieppe.

Your family name, may be in the link above



~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Back to Grandpa, and family, in 1913
~~~~~~~~~~
 Poultry Farm Survey
A Report on Sixty-five Commercial Poultry
Farms in the Lower Fraser Valley and
Vancouver Island

By
E. A. LLOYD, B.S.A. Associate Professor of Poultry Husbandry
V. S. ASMUNDSON, B.S.A., M.S.A. Assistant Professor of Poultry Husbandry
R. J., SKELTON, B.S..A. Field Enumerator
Department of Poultry Husbandry, College of
Agriculture, University of British Columbia,
Vancouver

NOTE: Readers, who don't favour the current (2012) Conservative Government spending habits, will like this.....found by looking at a result for a link to the Agricultural Instruction Act, 1913, Canada

 (with two sources provided:  Farmer’s Advocate and the Weekly Sun) Page 3 of 30
In April 1919, the Weekly Sun, published in Toronto, was purchased by the Farmers Publishing Company, renamed the Farmers’ Sun, and declared to be the official organ of the United Farmers of Ontario

Page 1  English and French

In 1913, the Canadian government introduced The Agricultural Instruction Act, a measure which granted ten million dollars to the provinces over ten years to aid agriculture. The Conservatives predicted that the Act would help in “aiding and advancing the farming industry by instruction in agriculture” but this paper argues that, ironically, the funding actually served to heighten rural discontent, not assuage it. By examining public documents and the rural press, the paper explores the rationale, rhetoric, and politics of this initiative. The funding designated for women’s groups is closely examined to determine its impact on the growth of groups like the Women’s Institutes.

"...... where did Grandpa move his family to in Canada?  Did they come to British Columbia?  Were they British or Ukranians?  Were they invited by old Clifford Sifton himself, ..... before the Great War, when he said:
'I think a stalwart peasant in sheepskin coat, born on the soil whose forefathers have been farmers for ten generations, with a stout wife and a half a dozen children, is good quality.'

 Poultry_farm_survey_1921

INTRODUCTION.
In the Lower Fraser Valley and Vancouver Island districts of British Columbia there is a large number of poultry farms. Nearly all of these farms are highly specialized. Over 90% of the revenue from them being derived from the sale of poultry products. Yet the typical poultry farm in British Columbia combines breeding with production of market eggs. For while market eggs are the chief product sold, very few farms can be classed as strictly commercial egg farms on account of the very considerable revenue produced on them from the sale of baby chicks, hatching eggs, and breeding stock.

Since the war there has been a rapid development in poultry farming in certain districts of British  Columbia. Many returned soldiers have taken up poultry farming under the Soldier Settlement Board. More over, many of the older established poultry-men have materially increased their flocks, and a considerable number of other settlers have gone into poultry farming in a specialized way.

Snip

Snip
 page 19 of 19
 (13) The average selling price per' dozen eggs on twenty-nine farms was $0.394, and the average estimated cost of production, including interest on investment at 7% and operator's wages at $80 per month, was $0.456. Wthout allowing operator's wages the cost of production was $0.32 per dozen.

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

This is one place Grandpa moved to. It was Canada.

Harper floored me, when he said, Ignatieff wasn't a true Canadian. That his father was, just a Russian immigrant.

Is Harper so stupid, he doesn't know this country was built by immigrant family's? My family lived on a farm, on the Canadian prairies. Everyone helped everyone else, who needed help. The immigrant family's sons went to war, right along side six members of my own family, that were in WW11.

The F.N. People helped immigrant family's too. Some came to Canada with nothing.

The F.N. hunted wild game for them. Gave them fish. They cut them firewood. Some immigrant family's had gunny sacks, wrapped around their feet for winter boots. The F.N. made them fur boots, jackets, and fur robes. In turn. Family's would give F.N. vegetables, chickens and pork to dry and smoke, along with their wild game and fish.

This is a sick, sick country, compared to those days, on the Canadian prairies.

This country has been disgraced, by Harper. He does not belong in our, once good and decent Canada.