Sunday, May 29, 2011

Premier Christy Clark is a "shade" short on bright ideas when it comes to CFL bulbs and Families first.

Update: March 23 2013 Stephen Hume's displeasure of  CFL:  Twice over. One  Two

In the old days, if someone had a bright idea, it was symbolized like this:


Then someone in Victoria had two "great" ideas.      The first resulted in an unexpected backlash against the BC Liberals from the public on the Harmonized Sales Tax (HST) intro, and then two years later the ire of the public was raised once again with the introduction of the Compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs).

CFLs are now leading the market for energy efficient residential lighting, and while they do cost more money to buy initially, they save homeowners money in the long run. They use much less energy to create the same level of light and are more energy efficient, which means a lower balance on your electrical bill. -  British Columbia Introduces Energy Efficient Light Bulb Standards 2011
Of course the CFL is "now leading the market", seeing as how the incandescent light bulbs between 75 and 100 watts was wiped off the face of the Best Place on Earth by the BC Liberal Government.



http://www.sfu.ca/sustainability/resources/greenpages/lights.html





BC Hydro advertising of "Efficient lighting: get the right light bulb for the job" has left my family household with a quandary that isn't going to be solved easily.  The problem is causing a monumental financial crisis as well, even though I can hear Christy Clark's new mantra being repeated over the airwaves by the Press, "Families First".

I have, in my house, nine lights that have Shades on them.  With the old incandescent light bulb, round headed in design, the springy-thing that is built into the Shade allows it to be snapped onto the bulb, but with the new shapes of the CFL bulbs there's a problem.   No Snap, No Bite.


No problem here

Problem here



















Lamp shades come in many forms, and price ranges.   $49 to $225


The Premier says that in her books its "Families First" time, why then, has the the BC Liberals rid us of our bed side table lamps, our reading lamps, and our lamp stands, and burdened us with CFL bulbs, when the old stand by lamp stands can no longer wear a shade.

For residents of North Vancouver, if you ever have to dispose of the CFL bulbs........ just hop in your car, and either go to Canadian Tire, or to London Drugs and they'll accept the bulbs.  If the CFL bulbs are broken DON'T throw them in the garbage like the good old days.  Broken CFL bulbs has mercury in them.

BC Hydro diminishes the mercury content in the CFL bulb by comparing it to the mercury in a wrist watch  battery, however, the last time I looked, a wrist watch battery wasn't made of glass!!


I've read somewhere that using green painters tape, one can "mop" up the area, then dispose of the mess, in a sealed plastic bag and then deliver it to ..... Canadian tire, London Drugs, or if all else fails, Home Depot.

 <=============================>
What if one breaks?
The federal government’s NRCan site includes the following directions for minimizing the risk of mercury contamination when disposing of a broken CFL:
When a CFL breaks on a hard surface:
  • Open windows (if possible) to ventilate the room for a few minutes.
  • Wear rubber gloves and scoop or sweep up the debris with a stiff paper or cardboard, and then place the debris in a sealed plastic bag.
  • Wipe the area with a damp paper towel and put it all in that same sealed plastic bag.
  • Fill out a Service Request through the Service Desk for pick up by Central Stores or find a recycling centre off campus through the BC Hydro website
When a CFL breaks on a carpet:
  • Open windows (if possible) to ventilate the room for a few minutes.
  • Wear rubber gloves to remove as much debris as possible with a stiff paper or cardboard.
  • Use sticky tape (such as duct tape) to pick up any small pieces of glass or fine particles, and then if necessary, vacuum the area and then immediately dispose of the vacuum bag along with the debris and sticky tape in a sealed plastic bag.
  • Fill out a Service Request through the Service Desk for pick up by Central Stores or find a recycling centre off campus through the BC Hydro website
  • All of this can be done by oneself – no need to call in a hazardous waste team

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

Broken light bulbs, containing mercury, should never be put in a plastic bag. They should be put into a tin can with a lid, or perhaps a plastic container with a lid. I have a small metal pail, i keep for sharps. However, mercury should always be put into a separate, sealed container.

Gary E said...

Light bulbs containing Mercury should never be allowed on the market. They are just as dangerous, if not more dangerous, than Asbestos.
Both are known causes of death.